Help and Frequently Asked Questions


Why do you allow community contributed content and questions?

Skillset allows community members to edit questions, contribute new questions, rate the quality of questions, grade test items and provide feedback to other users.blooms-taxonomy

When you contribute a question, you are actually testing your own knowledge of a subject. It is impossible to craft a quality test question without deep knowledge of a subject. A wealth of academic research has been done on Scales of Understanding, showing that when you can apply your knowledge in the form of a question, you have mastered a subject.

While you may encounter some poorly crafted questions on Skillset (which are quickly filtered out and deleted), the sum of all of the community contributed content provides an astounding insight into the zeitgeist of a particular high stakes exam. The “Wisdom of Crowds” effect, when properly moderated, ensures that the content for each high stakes exam is always current, topical and of high quality.

So go ahead. Give it a try. Challenge yourself by trying to create a great question. See how it improves your understanding of a topic.

 

I found a question that is incorrect or not appropriate. What should I do?

Skillset constantly evaluates test question items for quality algorithmically using feedback from our users. Simply answering and viewing a question gives Skillset data to feed our deep learning engine. If we detect that a question is the wrong difficulty for the current level it is in, we move it to the appropriate skill level. If we detect that a question is of low quality, we will delete it and prevent it from being shown to other users.

If you encounter a question you feel is incorrect or inappropriate, feel free to edit the question and fix it. This aids in your understanding of the topic being tested. You can also rate the question, using the star rating, which accelerates the question quality promotion or demotion within the system.

New or poorly rated questions don’t count towards your Exam Readiness, so don’t fret, just move on.

 

Why should I answer a peer assessment question?

Multiple choice test questions are flawed. They are wildly popular because solely because they are easy to design and can be graded by machines, NOT because they are a better test of knowledge. A multiple choice correct answer can be guessed, gamed, and often knowledge of “how to answer” the question is more important than a deep understanding of the topic being tested on. We have all experienced this in our lives, and there is much written about it. Even though the exam you are preparing for may not require essay or hands-on testing, there is no better test of your own mastery of a subject than to answer a complex item related to a key concept in written form. This can take many forms:

  • A short essay question
  • Analyze a set of data and come to a conclusion
  • Perform a hands-on task correctly and report output

The goal of Skillset is to guarantee you pass your high stakes exam. On the first try. Knowing that you have deep understanding of an important topic is key to passing your exam. Peer assessment questions are important data points for Exam Readiness.

Skillset Pro subscribers have their Peer Assessment questions graded faster and are not blocked from advancing in skills while their Peer Assessment questions are being graded.

If you want to replicate what your exam is like, sans Peer Assessment questions, try out the Simulated Exam.


 

How do you determine Readiness Level?

Everything you do on Skillset is used as a factor for Readiness Level. Here are the inputs to the Readiness Level calculation:

  • Frequency of usage
  • Reinforcement question
  • Training completed
  • Test item scores
  • Peer Assessment scores
  • Simulated exam scores
  • Test scores
  • Interdependency between proficiencies on related skills
  • Historical candidate data

 

 

Jack Koziol

Jack is a co-founder and CTO of Skillset. You can reach him at jack@skillset.com

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